One of the Expedition 34 crew members aboard the International Space Station, flying at an altitude of approximately 240 miles, photographed this vertical night view of the metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthplace, Atlanta, Georgia, is seen on January 20, 2013, in this image from the International Space Station as it flew approximately 240 miles above the city.

NASA honors Dr. King’s life and legacy by expanding mission equity, engaging in public service, and sharing knowledge for the benefit of all humanity.

Image Credit: NASA


Source: www.nasa.gov

The first Full Moon of 2023 is in the sky tonight opposite the Sun at 23:08 UTC. Big and beautiful, the Moon at its brightest phase should be easy to spot. Still, for quick reference images captured near the times of all the full moons of 2022 are aranged in this dedicated astro-imaging project from Sri Lanka, planet Earth. The day, month, and a traditional popular name for 2022's twelve full moons are given in the chart. The apparent size of each full moon depends on how close the full lunar phase is to perigee or apogee, the closest or farthest point in the Moon's elliptical orbit. Like the 2022 Wolf Moon at the 1 o'clock position, tonight's Full Moon occurs within a about two days of apogee. But unlike in 2022, the year 2023 will have 13 full moons that won't all fit nicely on the twelve hour clock.


Fra Angelico, Fra Filippo Lippi, The Adoration of the Magi.jpg

Adoration of the Magi, painted between 1440 and 1460 by the masters Fra Angelico and Filippo Lippi.



There, that dot on the right, that's the largest rock known in our Solar System. It is larger than every known asteroid, moon, and comet nucleus. It is larger than any other local rocky planet. This rock is so large its gravity makes it into a large ball that holds heavy gases near its surface. (It used to be the largest known rock of any type until the recent discoveries of large dense planets orbiting other stars.) The Voyager 1 spacecraft took the featured picture -- famously called Pale Blue Dot -- of this giant space rock in 1990 from the outer Solar System. Today, this rock starts another orbit around its parent star, for roughly the 5 billionth time, spinning over 350 times during each trip. Happy Gregorian Calendar New Year to all inhabitants of this rock we call Earth.


NGC 7469, a face-on galaxy, with gray spiral arms, sprinkled with bright red patches of star formation.

The James Webb Space Telescope spies the spiral galaxy NGC 7469, located 220 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Pegasus, in this image released on Dec. 21, 2022. This galaxy is very dusty, but Webb’s infrared vision can peer through to observe features like the intense ring of star formation close around its bright center.

Download the full-resolution image.

Image Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, L. Armus, A. S. Evans


Source: www.nasa.gov
The Moog SureFly aircraft hovers above Cincinnati Municipal Airport during an acoustic hover test.

NASA is taking a leading role to help integrate new types of Advanced Air Mobility aircraft like air taxis and delivery drones into the sky, helping emerging markets to safely develop an air transportation system that moves people and cargo between places previously not served or underserved by aviation. NASA is working with private sector developers of electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) aircraft, like Moog Surefly, to study the levels of noise ​they make.

In this photo from summer 2022, the Moog Surefly vehicle hovers above an array of 28 ground-level microphones at Cincinnati Municipal Airport. The microphones picked up noise data, which researchers from our Glenn Research Center in Cleveland will analyze and share the data with Moog. Data from tests like the one seen here will be used to improve aircraft design and reduce noise impacts on communities where eVTOLs will take off, fly, and land.

Learn more about this acoustic hover test here.

Image Credit: NASA


Source: www.nasa.gov
Clouds of gas cover the entire view, in a variety of bold colors. In the center the gas is brighter and very textured, resembling dense smoke. Around the edges it is sparser and fainter. Several small, bright blue stars are scattered over the nebula.

A portion of the open cluster NGC 6530 appears as a roiling wall of smoke studded with stars in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 6530 is a collection of several thousand stars lying around 4,350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The cluster is set within the larger Lagoon Nebula, a gigantic interstellar cloud of gas and dust. Hubble has previously imaged the Lagoon Nebula several times, including these images released in 2010 and 2011. It is the nebula that gives this image its distinctly smoky appearance; clouds of interstellar gas and dust stretch from one side of the image to the other.

Astronomers investigated NGC 6530 using Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. They scoured the region in the hope of finding new examples of proplyds, a particular class of illuminated protoplanetary discs surrounding newborn stars. The vast majority of known proplyds are found in only one region, the nearby Orion Nebula. This makes understanding their origin and lifetimes in other astronomical environments challenging.

Hubble’s ability to observe at near-infrared wavelengths – particularly with Wide Field Camera 3 – have made it an indispensable tool for understanding star birth and the origin of exoplanetary systems. The new NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope’s unprecedented observational capabilities at infrared wavelengths will complement Hubble observations by allowing astronomers to peer through the dusty envelopes around newly born stars and investigate the faintest, earliest stages of star birth.

Text credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, O. De Marco; Acknowledgment: M.H. Özsaraç

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940


Source: www.nasa.gov
Image center: blue, and pinkish-white swirls of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6956. Dark, reddish-brown dust lanes along the inner part of the spiral arms. Inky black background with foreground and distant stars and galaxies.

Against an inky black backdrop, the blue swirls of spiral galaxy NGC 6956 stand out radiantly. NGC 6956 is a barred spiral galaxy, a common type of spiral galaxy with a bar-shaped structure of stars in its center. This galaxy exists 214 million light-years away in the constellation Delphinus.

Scientists used NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope to image NGC 6956 to study its Cepheid variable stars, which are stars that brighten and dim at regular periods. Since the period of Cepheid variable stars is a function of their brightness, scientists can measure how bright these stars appear from Earth and compare it to their actual brightness to calculate their distance. As a result, these stars are extremely useful in determining the distance of cosmic objects, which is one of the hardest pieces of information to measure for extragalactic objects.

This galaxy also contains a Type Ia supernova, which is the explosion of a white dwarf star that was gradually accreting matter from a companion star. Like Cepheid variable stars, the brightness of these types of supernovae and how fast they dim over time enables scientists to calculate their distance. Scientists can use the measurements gleaned from Cepheid variable stars and Type 1a supernovae to refine our understanding of the rate of expansion of the universe, also known as the Hubble Constant.

Image Credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Jones (University of California – Santa Cruz); Processing: Gladys Kober (NASA/Catholic University of America)

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940


Source: www.nasa.gov

Bright at infrared wavelengths, this merging galaxy pair is some 500 million light-years away toward the constellation Delphinus. The cosmic mashup is seen against a background of even more distant galaxies, and occasional spiky foreground stars. But the galaxy merger itself spans about 100,000 light-years in this deep James Webb Space Telescope image. The image data is from Webb's Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI). Their combined, sharp infrared view follows galactic scale restructuring in the dusty merger's wild jumble of intense star forming regions and distorted spiral arms


The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is seen floating along in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022, in New York City.

The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is seen floating along in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on Thursday, Nov. 24, 2022, in New York City. The Astronaut Snoopy balloon is flying in New York City at the same time that Snoopy also flies around the Moon in the Orion spacecraft as a zero gravity indicator for the Artemis I mission.

Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls


Source: www.nasa.gov
Bright blue-white cloud with a black keyhole-shaped void in the middle. Edge of the blue-white cloud transitions to brownish-rusty colored cloud.

This peculiar portrait from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope showcases NGC 1999, a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion. NGC 1999 is around 1,350 light-years from Earth and lies near the Orion Nebula, the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. NGC 1999 itself is a relic of recent star formation – it is composed of debris left over from the formation of a newborn star.

Just like fog curling around a streetlamp, reflection nebulae like NGC 1999 shine by the light from an embedded source. In the case of NGC 1999, this source is the aforementioned newborn star V380 Orionis, which is visible at the center of this image. The most notable aspect of NGC 1999’s appearance, however, is the conspicuous hole in its center, which resembles an inky black keyhole of cosmic proportions.

This image was created from archival Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 observations that date from shortly after Servicing Mission 3A in 1999. At the time, astronomers believed that the dark patch in NGC 1999 was something called a Bok globule – a dense, cold cloud of gas, molecules, and cosmic dust that blots out background light. However, follow-up observations using a collection of telescopes, including ESA’s Herschel Space Observatory, revealed that the dark patch is actually an empty region of space. The origin of this unexplained rift in the heart of NGC 1999 remains unknown.

Text credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, ESO, K. Noll

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940


Source: www.nasa.gov
2 wispy, light blue, gas clouds: HH 1 upper right, HH 2 lower left. Both surrounded by dimmer, multi-colored clouds with dark-black background. Very bright orange star lower left of HH 1. Beyond that star, narrow jet emerging from the dark image center.

The lives of newborn stars are tempestuous, as this image of the Herbig-Haro objects HH 1 and HH 2 from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope depicts. Both objects are in the constellation Orion and lie around 1,250 light-years from Earth. HH 1 is the luminous cloud above the bright star in the upper right of this image, and HH 2 is the cloud in the bottom left. While both Herbig-Haro objects are visible, the young star system responsible for their creation is lurking out of sight, swaddled in the thick clouds of dust at the center of this image. However, an outflow of gas from one of these stars is streaming out from the central dark cloud and is visible as a bright jet. Astronomers once thought the bright star between that jet and the HH 1 cloud was the source of these jets, but it is an unrelated double star that formed nearby.

Herbig-Haro objects are glowing clumps found around some newborn stars. They form when jets of gas thrown outwards from these young stars collide with surrounding gas and dust at incredibly high speeds. In 2002, Hubble observations revealed that parts of HH 1 are moving at more than 248 miles (400 kilometers) per second!

Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 captured this turbulent stellar nursery using 11 different filters at infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelengths. Each of these filters is sensitive to just a small slice of the electromagnetic spectrum, and they allow astronomers to pinpoint interesting processes that emit light at specific wavelengths.

In the case of HH 1 and 2, two groups of astronomers requested Hubble observations for two different studies. The first delved into the structure and motion of the Herbig-Haro objects visible in this image, giving astronomers a better understanding of the physical processes occurring when outflows from young stars collide with surrounding gas and dust. The second study investigated the outflows themselves to lay the groundwork for future observations with the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. Webb, with its ability to peer past the clouds of dust enveloping young stars, will revolutionize the study of outflows from young stars.

Text credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, B. Reipurth, B. Nisini

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940


Source: www.nasa.gov
Technicians stack the JPSS-2 satellite atop the LOFTID spacecraft inside the Astrotech Space Operations facility at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California on Oct. 5, 2022.

Preparations continue for the launch of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Joint Polar Satellite System-2 (JPSS-2) satellite. On Tuesday, Oct. 4, JPSS-2 was attached to its payload adapter inside the Astrotech Space Operations facility at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. On Wednesday, Oct. 5, technicians and engineers completed the mate process using a crane to lift JPSS-2 and attach it to the top of the stack containing the re-entry vehicle for the Low-Earth Orbit Flight Test of an Inflatable Decelerator, or LOFTID, technology demonstration.

To prepare LOFTID for stacking, technicians mated the re-entry vehicle payload adapter interface ring to LOFTID inside Building 836 at Vandenberg. Then the team mated the payload adapter separation system inside the re-entry vehicle payload adapter canister. Finally, technicians lifted the payload adapter canister over the re-entry vehicle to complete the stack. The LOFTID stack was moved to Astrotech to complete mating operations with JPSS-2.

Next up, the assembly will be encapsulated in a protective payload fairing. After encapsulation, the team will transport the encapsulated spacecraft to Space Launch Complex-3 where a crane will hoist it up for attachment to the second stage of the United Launch Alliance Atlas V 401 rocket.

JPSS-2 and LOFTID together measure approximately 27 feet tall. Launch is targeted for Nov.1 from Vandenberg. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is managing the launch.

Photo credit: USSF 30th Spacewing/Aaron Taubman


Source: www.nasa.gov
A man from Colombia with shoulder length brown hair and facial hair, smiles widely at the camera wearing a light blue button up shirt and dark pants. His right elbow props him up on the railing outside at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Lee esta historia en español aquí

“As first-generation immigrants we have to figure things out on our own a lot of times. My parents were going through the same transition [to America] that I was going through [in high school]. We didn’t have a lot of direction. In order for me to get to the path that I’m on today, I had to figure a lot of things out on my own. Because I had to do it to survive, I think that that built into me some sense of independence and not being afraid of asking for help. I feel like those are some of my best skills, and they’ve been really useful for me in my career [as a NASA systems engineer].

“All throughout college, I worked as an English and math tutor for kids who were in a similar position as me: they’re in middle school or high school, they don't know a lot of English, and they don't know how to navigate the system. Normally, most tutors are trying to help with homework, but when you’ve experienced what I experienced and you see similar things happening to them, your role as a tutor becomes a little bit more.

“A lot of people in similar positions as myself, we struggle a lot with confidence and imposter syndrome. But having enough confidence to say, ‘I can do this. I’m ready, and even if I am not ready, I can be ready’ [is important]. I try to help people see that there’s an opportunity, and that if you work hard and are willing to evoke whatever it takes to get there, you can get it.

“It’s been a lot of delayed gratification because seven years ago I started as an intern, we launch [Europa Clipper] in 2024, and then it will be five years until we arrive at the Jupiter system. But I like that stuff. It’s a lot of work, but whatever we get out of [this mission] has the potential to change our understanding of who we are, and that’s really motivating for me.”

“It makes me feel like I am working towards a greater goal, and there’s no substitute to that. I could easily go work with another company, but I don't think I would be able to find this extremely important, humanity scale-type of investigation anywhere else.”

– Andres Rivera, Systems Engineer II, Europa Clipper Mission, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory 

Image Credit: NASA / Ryan Lannom
Interviewer: NASA / Tahira Allen 

Check out some of our other Faces of NASA.


Source: www.nasa.gov
Portrait of NASA astronaut Nicole Mann seated inside a T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field in Houston, Texas.

Astronaut Nicole Mann sits inside a T-38 trainer jet at Ellington Field in Houston, Texas, in this image from Nov. 15, 2018. She served as the T-38 safety and training officer; T-38s are used for pilot proficiency and training for astronauts.

Selected as an astronaut candidate in June 2013, Mann will be the first Indigenous woman from NASA in space. In her first spaceflight, she is scheduled to launch to the International Space Station as commander of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-5 mission aboard the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft no earlier than Oct. 5, 2022.

As mission commander, she will be responsible for all phases of flight, from launch to re-entry. She will serve as an Expedition 68 flight engineer aboard the station.

Watch our SpaceX Crew-5 mission launch to the Space Station.


Source: www.nasa.gov
On September 28, the Landsat 8 satellite passed directly over Hurricane Ian’s eye as the storm approached southwest Florida.

The Operational Land Imager aboard the Landsat 8 satellite captured this natural-color image of Hurricane Ian’s eye on Sept. 28, 2022 at 11:57 a.m. EDT (15:57 UTC), three hours before the storm crashed into the coast in Caya Costa, Fla.

When Ian’s eyewall made landfall, its maximum sustained winds were 150 miles (240 kilometers) per hour, according to the National Hurricane Center. That is the equivalent of a category 4 storm on the Saffir-Simpson wind scale and fast enough to tear the roofs off homes and snap power lines.

The eye of a hurricane is a circular zone of fair weather at the storm’s center. It is surrounded by a towering ring of extremely powerful thunderstorms called an eyewall, the part of the hurricane with the strongest winds. The swirling clouds along the edges of the eyewall are mesovortices—small-scale rotational features found in hurricanes with unusually strong winds.

Read more: Staring Into Ian's Eye

Image credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey.


Source: www.nasa.gov
Space Shuttle Endeavour being ferried by NASA's Shuttle Carrier Aircraft flies over the Johnson Space Center in Houston on its way to the California Science Center for display.

Our Shuttle Carrier Aircraft ferries the Space Shuttle Endeavour over the Johnson Space Center in Houston in this Sept. 20, 2012, image. Endeavour’s end destination was the California Science Center, where it sits on display. The shuttle Endeavour brought the first parts of the International Space Station to space and completed 25 missions.

On its final flight to the California Science Center 10 years ago, Endeavour was escorted by a combination of F/A-18s and an F-15 from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. Those aircraft were flown by NASA Armstrong pilots, while center photographers and videographers documented the orbiter’s final journey.

Image credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz


Source: www.nasa.gov
bright spiral galaxy fills the scene. Dark reddish-brown dust lanes bisect the spiral arms. Bright blue stars are dotted troughout.

The galaxy NGC 1961 unfurls its gorgeous spiral arms in this newly released image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Glittering, blue regions of bright young stars dot the dusty spiral arms winding around the galaxy’s glowing center.

NGC 1961 is an intermediate spiral and an AGN, or active galactic nuclei, type of galaxy. Intermediate spirals are in between “barred” and “unbarred” spiral galaxies, meaning they don’t have a well-defined bar of stars at their centers. AGN galaxies have very bright centers that often far outshine the rest of the galaxy at certain wavelengths of light. These galaxies likely have supermassive black holes at their cores churning out bright jets and winds that shape their evolution. NGC 1961 is a fairly common type of AGN that emits low-energy-charged particles.

The data used to create this image came from two proposals. One studied previously unobserved Arp galaxies, while the other looked at the progenitors and explosions of a variety of supernovae.

Located about 180 million light-years away, NGC 1961 resides in the constellation Camelopardalis.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, J. Dalcanton (University of Washington), R. Foley (University of California - Santa Cruz); Image processing: G. Kober (NASA Goddard/Catholic University of America)

Media Contact:

Claire Andreoli
NASA's Goddard Space Flight CenterGreenbelt, MD
301-286-1940


Source: www.nasa.gov
Astronaut Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, mission specialist, is photographed in this close-up view during one of the STS-92 sessions of extravehicular activity (EVA).

Astronaut Michael E. López-Alegría, mission specialist, is photographed in this close-up view during one of the STS-92 spacewalks on Oct. 18, 2000.

During his NASA career, López-Alegría logged more than 257 days in space and performed 10 spacewalks totaling 67 hours and 40 minutes. He flew on the STS-73, STS-92 and STS-113 space shuttle missions and spent seven months on the space station as commander of Expedition 14. In 2022, he served as commander of Axiom Mission 1, the first private astronaut mission to the International Space Station

Throughout National Hispanic Heritage Month, we're celebrating the contributions of the brilliant Hispanic people of NASA.

Image credit: NASA


Source: www.nasa.gov
A little blue heron is seen in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building as preparations for launch continue, Friday, Sept. 2, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

A little blue heron is seen in front of the Vehicle Assembly Building as preparations for launch continue, Friday, Sept. 2, 2022, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, Space Launch System (SLS) rocket, and supporting ground systems. NASA is currently targeting no earlier than Sept. 27 for launch, pending the success of a cryogenic demonstration test targeted for no earlier than Wednesday, Sept. 21.

Get the latest Artemis I updates.

Image credit: NASA/Keegan Barber


Source: www.nasa.gov
jfk_rice_speech

On Sept. 12, 1962, President Kennedy speaks before a crowd of 35,000 people at Rice University in Houston. During his speech, the President recommitted the nation to the Moon landing goal he proposed to Congress in May 1961, rallying the nation to land astronauts on the Moon before the end of the decade and bring the crew safely back to Earth.

We will provide live coverage of the final event celebrating the 60th anniversary of this speech at noon EDT (11 a.m. CDT) on Monday, Sept. 12 on NASA Television, the NASA app, and our website.

Image Credit: NASA


Source: www.nasa.gov